Breast cancer at 33: Telemundo host Adamari López leads with laughter

Spread the love
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Every weekday morning, Adamari López helps hundreds of thousands of viewers wake up with the Telemundo show, “Un Nuevo Día,” which she cohosts.

López is known for being bold, funny, and positive. Those traits have helped her on and off the air, especially during her battle against breast cancer, which she was diagnosed with at age 33.

Breast cancer is the most common cancer among Hispanic and Latina women, and López, who is Puerto Rican, has used her voice to raise awareness about early detection in those communities and beyond.

You were diagnosed with breast cancer at a young age and are now a long-term survivor. How were you diagnosed and treated?

“Look for that which makes you stronger, that which keeps you positive, that which can help move you forward.”

– Adamari López

I was 33 years old when I was diagnosed with breast cancer. It was at an excellent time in my career. I was in Mexico filming telenovelas and had just gotten engaged to my partner. One day I felt a little lump in one of my breasts. It surprised me. I went to the doctor. He thought that maybe it was just a normal occurrence during my period. He told me if the lump didn’t go away, I should get an ultrasound. Days later, I felt a sudden pain. They found that I had a mass in my breast.

No one had previously had cancer in my family, so it was difficult and surprising to hear the news. But after consulting different doctors, I [chose to] have surgery to remove my breast and be able to continue with my life. I had the love and support of my family, which was vital and essential for me. After that, I received chemotherapy. But in between chemo, I did a fertility treatment, which helped reassure me about still becoming a mother one day.

You are a strong supporter of prevention and early detection.

I’ve dedicated myself to helping organizations that are raising awareness about the importance of early breast cancer detection. I also help to serve as an example for other women, that one can survive the disease and that early diagnosis can save lives. That also helped me to heal. I felt like I was closer to people, and I understood the purpose that I felt was put on me to make a difference.

What do you do to maintain a healthy lifestyle?

Exercising, eating better, and spending time with nature are things that help me stay healthy. They are things that help me to be in good spirits and have a healthy body and mind. Laughing a lot, distracting myself with things that I like, and adding more water, fruits, and vegetables to my diet, as well as eliminating greasy foods, have helped, too.

Breast cancer is a leading killer of Hispanic and Latina women. What is your message to them?

Stay strong. Keep getting regular medical checkups. Get to know your breasts in order to detect cancer or any nodules in time to get it checked out. We should dedicate time to ourselves and have a positive attitude toward any situation that life puts us through. That, to me, is vital when one has to face any diagnosis and any situation that life puts in our path. Look for that which makes you stronger, that which keeps you positive, that which can help move you forward.

Is there anything else you’d like to share with our readers about your life or career?

A cancer diagnosis is not a synonym for death. It’s a synonym for fighting, for seeking strength, and for learning to enjoy the things that life offers us. Keep fighting for the things you dream of, to have a better life, a healthier life, a life of beautiful moments that you can create throughout your path.

Courtesy: NIH MedlinePlus Magazine, USA


Spread the love
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *