Ocular‐motor Deception Testing in Civilly Detained Sexually Violent Persons: An Alternative to Post‐Conviction Sex Offender Polygraph Testing?

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Post-conviction polygraph testing during sex offender (PCSOT) treatment is common. Ocular-motor deception testing (ODT) uses measures of cognitive load to assess credibility. The accuracy of ODT for discriminating deceptive from truthful response patterns in sexually violent persons was evaluated. Participants chose to ‘steal’ a voucher of monetary value and try to ‘beat the machine,’ or leave the voucher and respond truthfully. Compensation was determined by participants’ choices and the results of the ODT credibility assessment. Experiment 1 (n = 26) established a base rate of deception to optimize the ODT scoring model. Experiment 2 (n = 74) tested generalizability of the results. Tests of noninferiority found observed accuracy rates were not significantly less than published rates of 80%. Results support use of ODT methods as a potential alternative to PCSOT. Legal and ethical issues regarding the use of deception detection technologies impacting individuals involved in criminal justice systems are discussed.

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Source: Online Library, Wiley

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